Creative Ways to Keep Your Dog’s Memory Alive After She Dies

The hardest part of of having a dog is losing them much too soon. Not only is it excruciatingly painful, but it often involves some very, very hard decisions. It can be traumatic and takes a long time to move on.

Our deep bond with our pets has gained recognition over the years as more people see their dogs as family members, and the media has acknowledged how difficult it is to lose a pet: The Washington Post posted an article in 2012 titled: “The Death of a Pet Can Hurt as Much as the Loss of a Relative” and the same year, The New York Times posted the article, “Grieving for Pets and Humans: Is There a Difference?”

Psychology Today ran a 2016 article called, “Why Losing a Pet Hurts So Much.” “From one pet owner to another, we understand the intense pain and emptiness that occurs after this loss. There is no correct way to grieve and work through this process, as everyone walks down a different journey with a pet.”

Related: ‘A Dog Legends Are Made Of’: Owner Writes Touching, Yet Funny Obituary for Her Rescue Dog

It can help with the grieving process to find a way to memorialize your dog. There are many different ways to do this, so you can choose one that feels the most powerful — and natural — way to honor the intense love between you and your dog.

Have a …

“Healing After the Loss of Your Mother: A Grief & Comfort Manual,” A New Step-By-Step Grief Recovery Guidebook

Author Elaine Mallon has released “Healing After the Loss of Your Mother: A Grief & Comfort Manual” ($14.95, paperback, 9781733538909; $9.99, ebook, 9781733538930), a practical, step-by-step guidebook for those mourning the loss of their mother and for supporters hoping to help a loved one through grief. It is a book of comfort, guidance, and hope.

Mallon’s insight into grief comes from the heartbreaking experience of losing her mother suddenly and unexpectedly. Devastated and unprepared for how life-changing and painful processing the loss would be, Mallon found herself wondering: “Where’s the manual?” and “How do I do this?”

“This is the book I desperately needed when my own mom died,” says Mallon. “It is an essential companion for anyone uncertain about what to do or where to turn after their mother’s death.”

Like a compassionate friend, Mallon captures the raw, unique pain of losing your mother with empathy, honesty, and eloquence. She guides the reader through each step of the grieving process, offering straightforward answers to many common questions and tenderly addressing fears faced by those in mourning, as well.

This book also offers direction for those hoping to comfort someone who is grieving, by explaining what a person in grief is going through and how to be most helpful to them.

Family mourns victims in Tarpon Springs triple homicide

TARPON SPRINGS — Mike Ivancic stretched his arms out and, with Radiohead blasting in his ears Saturday, raised his body into downward dog in the very room where his father’s family was found dead just four days earlier.

On New Year’s Day, Tarpon Springs police said his father Richard Ivancic, 71; his stepmother Laura Ivancic, 59; and the couple’s 25-year-old son, Nicholas Ivancic; were found dead in their house alongside their three dogs.

Still missing is 21-year-old Jamie Ivancic. Her husband, Shelby Svenson, 25, was found in Ohio and charged with the three murders.

8 Ways to support a woman after she’s had a miscarriage

Acknowledge they are parents

Even if the miscarried child was their only pregnancy, that couple is still a mother and a father. Schwob says it’s important to “Validate the child as a precious life and acknowledge the mothers and fathers.”

Many mothers who miscarry feel like a failure. They feel guilt, thinking they could have avoided it somehow if only they’d been more aware of what was happening or taken care of their bodies in a different way. Schwob says, “Pregnant women immediately start planning and their nature is to protect that child. It’s a common thought that they have failed to do their job.” The feeling of guilt is common but it doesn’t make it true. Fathers have a hard time, too, because they cannot “fix” the problem. Help families grapple with guilt and understand that they aren’t failures.

Simply because the baby had a shorter life doesn’t mean mom and dad didn’t love their little one with all their heart. The grief process isn’t shorter and there should be no expectations for the couple to get over it, move on, and forget about the miscarriage. We can help by encouraging them to …

Don’t hide your grief from children. Grief can help bring you closer

…but like a great number of mothers (and fathers) after a bereavement, it wasn’t long before I attempted to pull myself together and go back to normal. And although at the heart of this was a desire to protect my daughter from my grief, I ended up distancing myself, creating a strained, unhealthy atmosphere. My understandable worry over the effect on her of what she’d seen made me cautious and reticent. It was as though we were communicating through glass, and the result was that I was no longer present as a mother in the way she needed me to be.

It’s impossible to be the parent you were after someone you love dies, because you aren’t the same person. But how do we explain this to our children? Death is one thing. But revealing your vulnerability too? This can feel irresponsible and unfair…

Dealing with Grief during Christmas & the holidays

Following the loss of someone close leaves a certain trepidation of days to come … birthdays, anniversaries, holidays, will never be the same. Thanksgiving, Christmas, Hanukkah and New Year’s can be some of the most difficult and challenging times.

Holidays are meant to spend time with those we love the most — sharing love, food, creating memories and laughter. So, how are we “celebrate” when those that we love the most will not be with us? It isn’t easy and for many people, it is the most difficult part of grieving and the time when we miss our loved ones even more.

How do we celebrate being together when there is an empty place at the table? Our sadness seems sadder, our loneliness is unfathomable and you just don’t feel like celebrating. How do we handle it? We face it head on. It is not really the grief we are trying to avoid, it is the pain that comes from it. Remember, grief is our internal feelings and mourning is our external expressions…

Santa delivers special letter to grieving Minnesota girl

HINCKLEY, MINN. — Santa Claus helped a Minnesota girl cope with her grief by delivering a special letter to the 9-year-old, WCCO reported.

Arianna Sam was adopted by her grandparents, who she considers her parents. So when her grandfather died in September, the Hinckley resident sent two letters to Santa, the television station reported.

“The other one was to my dad because, well, he’s gone so I wrote him a letter and I told Santa to go back to heaven and see what my dad would say back,” Arianna told WCCO.

Arianna thought Santa could help because “he flies,” she told the television station…

Grieving and Christmas & the Holidays

The holidays can be a rough time of the year for many of us. Two years ago this month I lost my brother suddenly 7 days after my father in law was diagnosed with brain cancer and we were told that he only had weeks to live. And as if that was not enough, we had to have our 12-year-old black lab put down in the middle of all of that. My brother’s funeral and my father in law’s funeral were literally 7 days apart! As bad as that all sounds, I have to say that year was one of the best Christmas’ we have ever had.

Even though my sister’s and I all suffered the same loss of a brother, they knew that for me, losing my father in law and a long time family pet on top of it was more than I could handle. My younger sister decided to have all of us to her home that year including my mother in law, my brother in law and his family and my sister in law’s parents. We had nontraditional food and my sister and I gave everyone small yet meaningful gifts to everyone. It was nothing but love for Christmas that year. And that’s what it should be every year.

If you are suffering a loss this year or like me your loss happened close to Christmas and the holiday’s, I highly recommend you be proactive about how you get through the holidays:

1. Acknowledge the loss and your grief. My father in law died 2 years ago today.

2. Ask for and accept help. Two years ago, I had a couple of dear friends go to my house and set up and decorate my Christmas tree and our church family fed us for 21 days straight.

3. Don’t feel  …

AllProDad: 6 Worst Things to Say to Someone Grieving

It’s okay, we all struggle with this. But grief is real and we can do better. We lose parents, we lose wives, and sometimes, we even lose our children. No judgment here, just some encouragement to be there for our brothers, and to swap out fear and distance for some grace and compassion. Take a few moments to think about the following list – along with some positive suggestions – of the six worst things to say to someone who has experienced loss:

1. Nothing

Saying nothing won’t work, because it’s important to acknowledge the loss, and it’s important to be there. If there’s nothing else to say, simply say, “I’m sorry.”   Read the rest

What To Do After A Fall At Work 

You commit a lot of time and energy to your job, so it only makes sense you want to feel safe when you’re there! While you can try to be as careful as possible, there are times when you may find yourself in a challenging situation in the workplace.

For example, you could experience a painful fall at work and not have any idea of what to do next. What you need to do is learn what steps you should take so you can properly handle this unfortunate turn of events and make sure you’re protected. Try to stay calm and remember that what’s most important is that you attend to any injuries.

Document the Incident with A Supervisor

After a fall at work, it’s highly recommended you contact a supervisor and document your accident. Give them details about what happened to you in writing and include specifics, so there are no gray areas later on. Inspect the spot where you fell and describe exactly what occurred and what you were doing at the time of the incident. Find out what the reporting procedures are at your workplace and complete any required documents immediately.

Identify any Witnesses & Take Photos

You also want to take time to identify any witnesses who may have seen the accident play out. Doing so will save you a lot of headaches down the road when it’s your word against your employer’s. Ask those who were around you at the time to also give their recollection of what they saw. Also, take photos of where the fall took place and collect any other evidence you can to help prove your case.

Get Treated by A Doctor

Regardless of how bad of a fall you take, it’s always a wise idea to see a doctor following your accident. You never know what injuries may pop up later due to your specific fall, so you want to make sure you’re evaluated and treated properly. You’ll also want these records available to you in the future when you need to take care of medical bills and show your employer what injuries you have experienced due to the incident in the workplace.

Verify You have Grounds for A Personal Injury Compensation Claim

It’s always important to see if you have grounds for a personal injury compensation claim after a fall at work. You don’t know what’s possible until you ask and get input from those who work with victims in similar situations as you. It’s important you contact professionals such as The Compensation Experts and have a conversation with them about your case in particular. They’ll be able to analyze the details, give you useful advice and recommend any next steps.

Conclusion

Falling at work can be a scary situation, and you may not be thinking clearly at the time of the accident. Take advantage of these suggestions for what you should do after you get hurt at work. Most importantly, attend to any injuries promptly and make sure you continue to heal nicely.