Phil Beastall’s latest film highlights Britain’s elderly loneliness crisis

Phil Beastall, a filmmaker whose work portrays the emotional distress that affects us all – covering themes such as love, loss and bereavement – has released a moving new film ahead of Christmas. …

Now, Beastall has released a new short film to highlight the nation’s loneliness epidemic amongst older people.

It was created in support of The Silver Line, a free confidential helpline founded by Dame Esther Rantzen, which provides information, friendship and advice to elderly people, 24 hours a day, every day of the year. The Silver Line is one of three charities supported by this year’s Telegraph Christmas Charity Appeal.

The new film, titled ‘The Anniversary’, which you can watch above, portrays a woman alone in her home, recalling an anniversary gift bought for her by her husband. As she sits at her desk, she removes a framed photograph of her husband and a photograph album dedicated to their wedding anniversaries.

At midnight, she lights a candle and then looks through the album, ending at a page headed “50th anniversary – renewing our vows”. She speaks only the words “happy anniversary, my darling”, staring at the empty page through her tears.

Read the rest and how you can help:

6 Simple Things You can do for Someone Who is Grieving at the Holidays

5. Create new holiday traditions

The holidays can be particularly hard for those who are grieving because of previously established traditions that may now be too painful to carry out. If they’re up for it, try doing something new this year.

“Work with your loved one to create a tradition or practice that serves as a containment for their grief, as well as helps them honor the lifetime of their departed loved one,” said Keisha M. Wells, a licensed professional counselor at Transformation Counseling Services in Columbus, Georgia.

“Volunteering with a local food pantry or starting a food or toy drive for families in need can be a great tribute and means of paying it forward during a difficult season,” she continued. “This activity of extending care and concern to others is a positive means to manage grief and sadness as you transfer your energy to someone else’s well-being versus your own emotions.”

See all 6 Suggestions:

How To Get Through Unexpected Grief

Grief Continues at Unexpected Times

I was traveling for work when the call came in — my dad wasn’t going to make it through the night. The world fell away, like everything was loud and silent at the same time. Nothing would ever be the same.

I didn’t have time to get to the airport. I didn’t have time to see him one last time.

I didn’t have time.

My mind floated back to the conversation I had with my dad six weeks prior. He called to tell me he’d been diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia. It felt like my body had been invaded with a mix of anger, anxiety, fear, and call to service that I didn’t even know was possible. All I could do at that moment was cling to his every word.

But now, at this moment, there were no words left.

This is the unexpected moment I was prepared for, even though I would never be ready for it. I knew grief would strike me when my dad passed. I knew that there would be a period of my life that I wanted to shut the world out to process my emotions. But there was so much to the grieving process I didn’t expect…

How do I deal with the death of a spouse?

This question was posed to Cathy Novaky, Ph.D., an outpatient clinician for Behavioral Health Services at Altantic Health System’s Newton Medical Center.

Q: My husband died last year, and my family seems to have dealt with it and moved on. But I’m still missing him every day. Is that wrong?

A: First, let me say that I’m sorry for your loss. It’s only one year since you lost your husband. You’re not doing anything wrong. You’re grieving. How we experience grief is as individual as we ourselves are. Personal factors like coping style, life experiences, faith and the depth of the loss all contribute to how grief affects you. Common symptoms of grief include shock, disbelief, sadness, guilt, anger, loneliness and fear. Some people lose motivation or try to isolate themselves. Physical symptoms like fatigue, weight change, aches and pains and insomnia may occur as well. Keep in mind, any of these could be considered a reasonable response to loss.

There is no right or wrong way to grieve, no timetable, no specific steps you need to go through. Most people are familiar with the Kubler-Ross “Five Stages of Grief:” denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. However, you do not have to go through each stage to heal, and some people don’t go through any of them.

The most important message for healing from grief is to recognize what’s happening, be patient with yourself, and reach out for support. Don’t try to escape the pain with self-medication like drinking or diving into work or TV; try to acknowledge that you’re suffering from loss and accept that it’s natural, even though it doesn’t feel comfortable. I usually tell my patients that our pain in loss represents the respect and caring we feel toward the lost one, and it honors them and what they brought to our lives. Missing your husband shows how important he was, and still is, to you.

Take care of yourself. Be patient with the roller coaster of emotions. Treat yourself to healthy food and …

Read the rest of how do I deal with the death of a spouse below:

A Neuroscientist used his Research to Heal from Grief using This

Our brain on gratitude

Neuroscientist Glenn Fox has dedicated his life to studying gratitude — how it improves our resilience, lowers stress, and boosts overall health. He’s an expert on the ability of gratitude to help us through tough times.

But on Thanksgiving in 2013, Fox was feeling anything but grateful. That’s because, just a few days before, he’d lost his mother to ovarian cancer.

Your brain on gratitude: How a neuroscientist used his research to heal from griefThe day after, going down to Starbucks for coffee and some pastries, “it was like the most intense experience ever. And I just thought, how am I even going to get through this? How am I even going to order?”

Fox was just months away from completing his Ph.D. on the neural bases of gratitude. He knew from his research how therapeutic gratitude can be — and how it could help him in his long journey recovering from grief. What he didn’t know was how to make that happen on a practical level.

“I thought, you know, I really need to put this into action,” he said. “I don’t want to be flattened by this forever. I don’t want this to define me.”

Jealous of the Angels – read this beautiful poem

Fox’s personal journey into the power of gratitude began after his mother’s diagnosis with stage 4 ovarian cancer. She was interested in his work, but also interested in how it could help her…

“Gratitude fits into a category of what we would call pro-social emotions, and these are emotions that orient us towards the welfare of others,” Simon-Thomas said. “It creates this kind of bond, this enduring sense of connection, with another person or another organism who we’re poised to cooperate with.”

That cooperation, Simon-Thomas said, has been key to our survival as a species.

Learn more about healing with gratitude:

Jealous of the Angels

I didn’t know today would be our last
Or that I’d have to say goodbye to you so fast
I’m so numb, I can’t feel anymore
Prayin’ you’d just walk back through that door
And tell me that I was only dreamin’
You’re not really gone as long as I believe
There will be another angel
Around the throne tonight
Your love lives on inside of me,
And I will hold on tight
It’s not my place to question,
Only God knows why
I’m just jealous of the angels
Around the throne tonight
You always made my troubles feel so small
And you were always there to catch me when I’d fall
In a world where heroes come and go
Well God just took the only one I know
So I’ll hold you as close as I can
Longing for the day, when I see your face again
But until…

Source: LyricFind

Military families grieving loss attend seminar of healing

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Grief comes in all shapes and sizes, affecting any person from young to old and leaving an impact that could make hope seem unattainable.

When Bonnie Carroll founded the Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors, or TAPS, in 1994, she had her late husband Brigadier General Tom Carroll in mind.

Carroll turned her grief over her husband’s death in an Army plane crash to action, noting a lack of resources for grieving military families at the time.

“My husband was an Army officer, and he was a great leader,” Carroll said. “You know this is really something that he would do. It’s bringing people together, it’s finding a way forward. It’s letting people know that they’re life and service of their loved one is remembered.”

At the TAPS Southeast Regional Seminar and Good Grief Camp at the Hyatt Regency in Downtown Jacksonville this weekend, recently retired and active service members have volunteered as mentors for military children at the conference…

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OxyContin Crusader Is Making An Impact

Barbara Van Rooyan’s Purdue experience is a story of deception, sadness and frustration — yet when she tells it now, she emits a surprising spark of energy. That’s because Van Rooyan, part of the unlikely group of citizens who repeatedly took flailing swings at Purdue Pharma, is watching the giant fall.

Van Rooyan, who has studied the cases against Purdue closely, sees the paradox in the proffered settlement: Much of the payout would be financed by profits from the continued sale of OxyContin, under a new company that would be formed following a Chapter 11 bankruptcy.

More about Barbara’s story and crusade:

Michigan Mom starts podcast for grieving parents

A Grand Rapids [Michigan] mother couldn’t find a podcast focused on losing a child, so she started her own.

Dr. Marcy Larson’s 14-year-old son, Andy, died in a car crash on Aug. 15, 2018. The family was on US-131 near the West River Drive exit when their van was rear-ended.

As she wrote on her website titled Always Andy’s Mom, Larson found it nearly impossible to get through a book about grief.

Larson is a pediatrician and her husband is an anesthesiologist. He has a podcast focused on health care, so Larson hoped there would be one that could help her grapple with the debilitating grief.

“Because I really couldn’t find one, I just decided it’s up to me to start one….

More:

Our Hospice of South Central Indiana offers a Bereavement camp for children

Register by Sept. 9, 2019

Children who have experienced grief over the death of a person in their life can attend a camp to help them cope.

Our Hospice of South Central Indiana is offering Camp Eva, a half-day bereavement camp for children ages 5-12, 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. 14.

Grief Help logo

Any child who has experienced the death of a significant person or persons in their lives is welcome and encouraged to attend. Camp Eva provides a structured and supportive environment for children to openly share their feelings and memories of their loved one.

Camp Eva will be at Columbus Youth Camp at 12454 West Youth Camp Road in Columbus.

Registration is open now and pre-registration is required by Sept. 9.

Registration materials are available on the Our Hospice website www.crh.org/service-centers/hospice/our-hospice-news-events/our-hospice-news/2019/06/03/camp-eva-bereavement-camp-for-kids-on-september-9-2019. A one hour parent/caregiver meeting is included as part of the camp.

Questions can be directed to Jessica Curd at 812-314-8044 or jcurd@crh.org.